TOGETHER INTO THE FUTURE

With the start of a fresh new year, 2019, I would like to share some New Year’s wishes expressed by officials of the Polish government. Stanislaw Karczewski, who who is the Marshal of the Senate of the Republic of Poland, in a New Year’s staement recently invited all those who feel any connection with their forefathers’ homeland, Poland, to feel welcome to visit Poland, keep abreast of what is happening there, and he wished all Poles, and those  with Polish roots, to nurture their cultural identity, so that in doing so we form a bonded community, which we can build on going into the future.

Just as his words appeared in the last edition of the Polish Weekly, 1-9-19, Poland’s President, Andrzej Duda, in reflecting on the historically significant year past, 2018, and standing on the threshhold of the New Year of 2019, noted that with the 100th anniversary of Poland’s regaining independence, “It was a great celebration time of Polish freedom and national pride”… The feast of all of us”. He pointed out that as in 1918 “we gathered under the white and red flag” and thus he expressed hope that “there will always be a place for each of us under our flag”. He invited everyone that throughout the New Year there will continue to be significant historical occasions to commemorate, ” to once again take stock of our history of tenacious striving for freedom, independence, and peace”.

I would also like to share, in part and translation, New Year’s wishes expressed to the Polish nation, on January 1, 1919, by Marshal Jozef Pilsudski. He stated that these wishes were the first one’s expressed to a free Poland in over 123 years. He commented on the dramatic changes the Great War and its aftermath created, especially in Europe, bringing down powerful empires and armies, particularly those who held Poland hostage. He pleaded that despite threatening chaos surrounding Poland, that the nation join together to protect its borders and to work to ensure and to build a new and truly free and strong Polish republic. Though he realized that the task was a daunting one, it was absolutely necessary. He appealed to all to work together to rebuild the country and ensure its future.

What took place in Poland in the 20 years following her regaining of independence was that, despite 123 years of bondage and destruction during the war, the country produced a significantly patriotic generation. This was the generation, imbued with a strong sense of history, age old traditions and values, and a love of their country and nation, was prepared, and eventually made ready, to deal with the extreme and disruptive challenges of WWII, invasions and occupations by both Nazi Germany and Soviet Russia, and then the near five decades of destructive communism rule, which many of these young patriotic Poles survived and eventually overcame, to ensure that Poland was once again free and independent.

I share these New Year’s wishes as in them I see a call, a summons even to us, those of Polish heritage, living in America. Most of us certainly enjoy a comfortable life, free to do as we please, free to steer our way as we see fit. We have many options available to us: what we want to address as important, what we want to spend our time on, what we think can make a difference in our lives, the lives of our families, and even our nationality group. Most of us are reasonably content and secure looking ahead to the future. I invite you however to consider and envision how much of what we enjoy and cherish will continue through its own accord into our future, the future of our children and grand children, the communities we live in? Who will we be or become in generations to come? What will continue of what we value without our attention and nurturing?

I speak of course from the perspective of our Polish heritage, the often fought for resplendent history we share that preceded us, the striving to protect, nurture, and pass on what many of us feel, and those before us felt, is a rich heritage, values and ideals that helped our forefathers, and even those more recent compatriots, to rise up and conquer unbelievable challenges. Are we doing anything to pass this on to our children, the next generation, informing others of what is good and valuable in our heritage? It seems to be a daunting task- just as Marshal Pilsudski described  the work that awaited the new Polish nation- but are we not responsible to do our share today?

To ensure success of any task takes a vision, commitment and  working together. The many Polish American organizations that were formed and worked through the years before us are an example of such efforts. Polish American Congress exists to bring these organizations and all individuals together for the purpose primarily of protecting Poland and Polonia’s existence and good name, promoting our heritage, serving and nurturing our communities, and strengthening our bond as a nationality group, even as we live in this country. Is not the legacy of the generations that came before us worth such protection, time investment, and a worthy gift to our children, grandchildren, and generations after us?

Just as President Duda addresses the importance of celebrating our brave history, Poland’s Senate Chief appeals to all to build on our shared identity, and Pilsudski summoned us to work and build together, we too can step up this year, with a renewed commitment to join in doing something to promote our heritage and strengthen our identity, even in America. As we live in today’s diversified world, we need ever more to feel that identity and pride in who we are, where we come from, not detracting from the country we live in or of which we are citizens. It is enriching and it is encumbant upon us not to break, but rather strengthen, the beautiful chain that links us to Poland and our Polishness.

This year Polish American Congress- Michigan celebrates 75 years as an organization. In March we will have elections. It is never too late to join as a member, to become more active, to commit  time in some way to ensure a better and lasting future for our community of Polonia. Following today’s appeal we hope to inform you more as to what we are doing, what plans we have, and how you can become involved. Our division office is in Hamtramck, 11333 Jos. Campau. You can reach us at 313-365-9400; on our website pacmi.org; or like us on Facebook.

Happy New Year!

Ann Bankowski, President

Polish American Congress, Michigan Division

Polish American Congress Michigan Division leads the State of Michigan in celebrations of the 100th anniversary of Poland’s regained independence

The Polish American Congress Michigan Division, as a leading Polonian organization in the State was a host to numerous initiatives, projects and celebrations related to the 100th anniversary of Poland’s regained independence.

One of the biggest accomplishments of our division of PAC was creating billboards that were placed at two busy crossroads of Metro Detroit. The billboards educated commuters about Poland’s 100th anniversary of regained independence. The idea was originated by the late Dr. Thaddeus Radzilowski (President of the “Piast Institute”). After his untimely passing, PAC-Michigan decided to make this reality. The billboard created by PAC-MI read: “100 years of Poland’s Regained Independence. 1918-2018. Thank You America! We honor Armistice Day November 11 PAC of Michigan”. The wording was placed on a white and red background, and featured the Polish and American flags. One of the billboards (a digital one) was placed on Hall Road, just east of Van Dyke; the other one on E.14 Mile Rd., near Dequindre Rd. Commuters were able to see the billboards throughout November and part of December.

Just as the billboards were created to educate the public about Poland’s history, another project served as a similar tool. Our division published a special pamphlet “Poland’s Road to Independence” which featured facts leading up to the historical date of November 11, 1918, and featured key historical figures who had the biggest impact on Poland’s regaining independence. The booklet was distributed at various events, often during non-Polonian social gatherings.

The Polish American Congress – Michigan Division has also produced colorful pins, bumper stickers and decals- memorabilia for our members and the general public, to display or wear proudly, as a patriotic gesture and another way of educating the public.

The centennial was also the theme of this year’s Polish Day Parade in Hamtramck on Labor Day, which PAC-MI sponsors annually, and was highlighted with a beautiful themed float for many to view.

The culmination of our year-long celebrations came on November 11, when our Division hosted an elegant banquet at the American Polish Cultural Center in Troy, MI. Representatives of almost all Polish-American organizations were present, as well as dignitaries from U.S. and Canada. Mr. Richard Walawender, recently appointed Honorary Consul of Poland in Detroit, gave the banquet’s keynote address. A State Senator, a Michigan Congressman, and the Michigan Governor’s Office, presented tributes and Proclamations. The event’s program also included presentations by the Polish Scouting Organization of Michigan, “Rodacy” Polish Folk Ensemble and Adam Mickiewicz Polish Language School (whose students depicted roles of famous Polish historical figures). Among other points of the program, the award-winning choir “Filarets” performed a variety of patriotic songs, particularly the Legionnaire ones of that era, inviting guests to join in the singing. Including all program participants and guests, we had well over 300 persons in attendance.

Interesting exhibits accompanied the banquet festivities. Dariusz Klepko (of Polish American Numismatic Society of Michigan) along with his daughter, Julia, prepared a display “The Greatest Poles and other Leaders who helped free Poland 100 years ago” which featured numismatic related items. “12 Heroes of Polish Independence” was a special display (created with the help of the Polish-Slavic Credit Union in NY) presenting the most instrumental figures in the fight for Poland’s independence. Zdzislaw Foryś shared many items from his private collection of Jozef Pilsudski memorabilia, while Jerzy Barycki, President of Polish Canadian Congress – Windsor-Chatham Chapter, shared a power point presentation “Polish Army Camp in Canada during World War I”.

Kudos go to the banquet committee, under the chairmanship of Ann Bankowski, for working tirelessly to make this event a great success!

Condolences to the Family of Former President George H.W. Bush

 

As President of the Polish American Congress, and on behalf of the PAC Executive Committee, our PAC members, Polish Americans throughout our great country, as well as our many friends, I extend my deepest sympathies to the President George H.W. Bush Family upon his passing.

The death of the 41st President of the United States brings to mind the many times President Bush supported Poland’s quest for freedom.

As we say farewell to a decorated World War II veteran, as well as a consistent fighter for freedom during the Cold War, I wish to thank President Bush for his support of the Solidarity Movement that resulted in Poland becoming free in 1989.

Polish Americans stand in unity with Andrzej Duda, President of the Republic of Poland, who recently noted after President Bush’s passing the following words spoken during the Solidarity era. These words ring true today as they did in 1989:

“Today, to those who think that hopes can forever be suppressed, I say: Let them look at Poland. To those who think that freedom can be forever denied, I say: Let them look at Poland. And to those who think that dreams can be forever repressed, I say: Look at Poland! For here in Poland, the dream is alive.”

During his long career in public service, Mr. Bush traveled to Chicago and visited the Polish National Alliance headquarters. He was warmly received. As Vice President, Mr. Bush also attended the funeral wake for Aloysius Mazewski, Polish American Congress and Polish National Alliance President. For his genuineness and caring support, we are very grateful.

Sincerely,

Frank J. Spula

President, Polish American Congress

DETROIT POLONIA CALENDAR

Sponsored by the Polish American Congress / Michigan Division

 

EVERY THIRD SUNDAY OF THE MONTH

Polish American Congress Michigan Division Polish Mass at St. Ladislaus Church in Hamtramck (2730 Caniff) for the intention of PAC and Polonia. 9:00 am. Coffee Reception after the Mass.

 

NOVEMBER 2018

 

Sunday, November 11, 2018 – Polish American Congress Michigan Division is hosting a banquet celebrating 100th anniversary of Poland’s Independence at the American Polish Cultural Center. More details to come.

 

Sunday, November 25 – Detroit Pistons celebrate Polish Heritage Night as they take on the Phoenix Suns at Little Caesars Arena.  Come early for traditional pre-game Polish dance performance.  Purchase tickets at Pistons.com/Polish

 

Sunday, November 25 – TheAmerican Polish Cultural Society invites you to a play by Kazimierz Braun “Tamara L.” performed by the great artists of Polish-Canadian Society of Poetry, Music and Theatre in Toronto. (performance in Polish language).

 

DECEMBER 2018

 

Saturday, December 1 – Polish American Congress Michigan Division Quarterly General Membership Meeting at 10:0 am.  Holiday Reception after the meeting.  PAC MI, 11333 Joseph Campau, Hamtramck, MI 48212

 

December 7 – 21 – Exhibit “The Spirit of Polish Independence” at Duderstadt Center Gallery, 2281 Bonisteel Boulevard, University of Michigan North Campus, Ann Arbor.  The exhibition illustrates the fight of the Polish nation for freedom and independence from the end of XVIII century through World War II.   It is an unique opportunity to share Polish and U.S. history with broad audiences and is appropriate for youth and adults.  The exhibit is in English and Polish.  Admission is free and open to the public 7:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. daily.

 

Saturday, December 8 – The Chancellor Christmas Concert at the Chapel of Our Lady of Orchard Lake (3535 Commerce Rd., Orchard Lake, MI 48324).  6:00 pm.  Performers include Kontra Banda & Friends from Chicago, St. Mary’s Preparatory Band, the SS. Cyril & Methodius Seminary Choir, and the Fr. Józef Dąbrowski Polish Language School Children’s Choir.  For more information, please call at (248) 683 0433.

 

Saturday, December 15 – Friends of Polish Art is hosting its annual “Wigilia Celebration”.  American Polish Cultural Center (2975 E. Maple Rd., Troy, MI).  Doors open at 5:30 (6:00 Cash Bar, 6:45 Program, 7:15 Multicourse Meatless Dinner).  Sing-A-Long, Raffle, At an Old Polish Christmas Table” narrated by Marcia Lewandowski.  Koledy by Curtis Posuniak.  Tickets/Information by calling 313-891-0696.

 

MARK YOUR CALENDARS

 

Saturday, January 5, 2019 – Thirteenth Annual Opłatek: St. Colette Catholic Church, 17600 Newburgh Rd., Livonia, 48152: Noon – 3:30 p.m.; Performance & kolędy with Filarets Choir; Honoring Polish Genealogical Society of Michigan on 40th Anniversary [Details T/B/A at www.detroitpolonia.org]

 

Saturday, October 5, 2019 – Club Filarets annual “Dinner-Dance”.  More information to come.

 

For more information or to list an event:

– Call the PAC/MI office at 313-365-9400

– Email information to DetPoloniaCalendar@Comcast.net

– Mail the information to: PAC/MI Calendar, 11333 Jos. Campau, Hamtramck, MI 48212

Please include a phone number if we need more information.

PAC Michigan to host a Celebration of 100th Anniversary of Poland’s Regained Independence

 

“Dywizjon 303” to be screened in Detroit

Kontrast Entartainment invites you to the screening of a movie “Dywizjon 303. Prawdziwa Historia” (“Squadron 303”).

The film, directed by Denis Delić, will be screened on Sunday, October 7, at AMC Forum 30 in Sterling Heights (44681 Mound Rd) at 4:00 pm.  Tickets are available for purchase at Srodek’s Campau Quality (Hamtramck), American Polish Cultural Center (Troy) and on-line at brownpapertickets.com.

Based on true story, the film tells the story of the highly regarded fighter squadron, in which served mainly soldiers from Poland, in the history of aerial combat and their heroic defense of England during World War II, Battle of Britain against Nazi attacks.  The 303 Squadron shot three times more Luftwaffe planes than any other allied squadrons.

The film features most popular Polish actors, including Maciej Zakościelny, Piotr Adamczyk and Antoni Krolikowski.

The screenplay for the movie was inspired by a book written by Polish famous writer, journalist and adventurer, Arkady Fiedler.  He wrote 32 books that have been translated into 23 languages and sold over 10 million copies in total.  He wrote books about his travels (including Mexico, Indochina, Brazil, Madagascar, West Africa, Canada and United States), documenting cultures, customs and natural wonders.

“Dywizjon 303” (“Squadron 303”) was his most famous book.  It was written in 1942 and sold over 1.5 million copies.

For more information about upcoming screening of “Dywizjon 303” movie, please call: 248-707-0577 lub 248-396-1370.

DETROIT POLONIA CALENDAR

DETROIT POLONIA CALENDAR

Sponsored by the Polish American Congress / Michigan Division

 

EVERY THIRD SUNDAY OF THE MONTH

Polish American Congress Michigan Division Polish Mass at St. Ladislaus Church in Hamtramck (2730 Caniff) for the intention of PAC and Polonia. 9:00 am. Coffee Reception after the Mass.

 

Monday, September 10, 2018 – 7:00 pm – Polish American Congress Michigan Division Quarterly General Membership Meeting at PAC-MI Headquarters (11333 Joseph Campau, Hamtramck, MI 48212).

 

Saturday-Sunday, September 15-16, 2018 – 100 Years of Poland’s Independence Celebration at Orchard Lake Schools.  Events include Summit Discussion, Mass, Concert, Exhibition and more.  Details at www.polishmission.com

 

Sunday, September 16, 2018 – Dozynki Polish Dinner organized by PNA District X Women’s Division.  Doors open at 1:00 pm.  Dinner at 2:00.  American Legion Carl E. Stitt Post 232 (23850 Military Rd., Dearborn Hts., MI).  Polish Buffet Dinner.  Open Bar. Raffles. Import Gift Stations. Entertainment.  More information at 734-676-1934 or 734-591-4249.

 

OCTOBER 2018

Sunday, October 7, 2018 – Screening of a movie “Dywizjon 303” at AMC Forum 30 in Sterling Heights (44681 Mound Rd). 4:00 pm. Tickets available at Srodek’s Campau Quality in Hamtramck or American Polish Cultural Center (Troy). More information by calling: 248-707-0577 lub 248-396-1370.

 

Sunday, October 14, 2018 – Pulaski Day in Wyandotte. Mass at Our Lady of the Scapular at 12 Noon, following by the procession to Pulaski Park, Ceremony by the Pulaski Monument, and Lunch at the PAVA Post 95 (2935 11th Street). Donations accepted.

 

Sunday, October 21, 2018 – 25th Anniversary of “Chopiniana” at the American Polish Cultural Center in Troy (2975 E. Maple Rd, Troy, MI 48083).  Performing: Macomb Symphony Orchestra (Prof. Thomas Cook, Director) and Kazimierz Brzozowski Pianist.  More information by calling 248-689-3636.

 

Saturday, October 27, 2018 –  Eleventh Annual All Saints’-All Souls’ Pilgrimage, Prayer Service & Wypominki:  11:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.:  St. Hedwig Cemetery, 23755 Military Rd., Dearborn Hts. 48127:  Celebrating 100th Anniversary of the End of World War I and 100th Anniversary of Poland’s Independence; Prayer Service at 11 a.m. with Society President Rev. Gary Michalik and Society Director Rev. Canon Walter J. Ptak; Feature Presentation by Ms. Henrietta Nowakowski, Historian:  “My Father Was A Hallerczyk,” with Commentary by Society Member Mary Bartus-Sidick; Optional Banquet at Deluca’s, 27424 Warren Ave., Westland 48185 [See flyer at www.detroitpolonia.org or call 1-866-POLONIA for details]

 

Sunday, October 28, 2018 – Central Citizens Committee Pulaski Day Banquet. More information to come.

 

Sunday, October 28, 2018 – Polish Bilingual Day at the American-Polish Cultural Center in Troy (2975 E. Maple Road). 2:00 to 6:00 pm.  Events include a performance by the Polish Theatre Institute in the USA, from New York, fun acting workshops by Dream Tale Puppets founder, director, designer, and leading performer, Jacek Zuzanski, interactive and fun educational programs by Polish American Numismatic Society, a Polish game room, where kids of all ages can learn and play Polish-designed board and video games, a lecture on innovation and history in Polish video game design & philosophy by Professor Alina Klin of Wayne State University, a lecture on the 100th Anniversary of Polish Independence and more. Details at www.polishmission.com

 

NOVEMBER 2018

Sunday, November 11, 2018 – Polish American Congress Michigan Division is hosting a banquet celebrating 100th anniversary of Poland’s Independence at the American Polish Cultural Center.  More details to come.

 

Saturday, January 5, 2019 – Thirteenth Annual Opłatek:  St. Colette Catholic Church, 17600 Newburgh Rd., Livonia, 48152:  Noon – 3:30 p.m.; Performance & kolędy with Filarets Choir; Honoring Polish Genealogical Society of Michigan on 40th Anniversary [Details T/B/A at www.detroitpolonia.org]

 

For more information or to list an event:

– Call the PAC/MI office at 313-365-9400

– Email information to DetPoloniaCalendar@Comcast.net

– Mail the information to: PAC/MI Calendar, 11333 Jos. Campau, Hamtramck, MI 48212

Please include a phone number if we need more information.

Polish Day Parade 2018

The annual Polish Day Parade organized by the Polish American Congress Michigan Division Polish Day Parade Committee took place on Labor Day, September 3, in downtown Hamtramck.

For more pictures visit our Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/Polish-American-Congress-Michigan-Division-241433862578705/

 

PAC-MI QUARTERLY MEMBERSHIP MEETING – SEPTEMBER 10

The Polish American Congress Michigan Division invites all its members and delegates to a Quarterly Membership Meeting.  It will take place on Monday, September 10, at 7:00 pm, at the PAC-MI Headquarters in Hamtramck, MI (11333 Joseph Campau, Hamtramck, MI 48212).

“Polskie getta” to kłamstwo historyczne. Wezwij do jego usunięcia! Apel Reduty Dobrego Imienia – Polskiej Ligii przeciw Zniesławieniom

Szanowni Państwo!

“Polskie getto” to oczywisty błąd zarówno historyczny, jak i językowy, kojarzący Polaków ze zbrodniami niemieckimi. “Polskie getta” nigdy nie istniały, ponieważ Polacy nie mieszkali w wydzielonych, odizolowanych częściach miast. To również nie Polacy tworzyli getta dla obywateli innych narodowości czy wyznań, choć i tak właściwym atrybutem w tym przypadku jest narodowość ludności zamieszkującej getto. Spośród wielu portali, które wzywaliśmy do poprawienia tej błędnej i zniesławiającej frazy, kilka pozostało przy swoim stanowisku.

Oto one:
Amerykański portal timesrecordnews.com promuje książki o tematyce Holokaustu. Z artykułu nie dowiemy się o Niemcach.
Brytyjski magazyn unbound.com, opisuje powojenne losy zbrodniarza Auschwitz, Josefa Mengele.
Lokalny amerykańskie media marblehead.wickedlocal.com, relacjonują spotkanie uczniów szkoły w Marblehead z ocalałą z Holokaustu.
Portal francuskiej fundacji artystycznej blouinartinfo.com, przedstawia twórczość inspirowaną losem prześladowanych.

Poniżej publikujemy wzór listu w języku angielskim oraz jego robocze tłumaczenie na język polski. Prosimy użyć w korespondencji wersji w języku angielskim.

Szanowni Państwo!

W artykule na Państwa stronie internetowej po linkiem …………………………….. znalazło się zniesławiające, uderzające w dobre imię Polski i fałszujące historię sformułowanie „Polskie getto” w odniesieniu do żydowskiego getta w okupowanej Polsce.

Podobnie jak podczas II Wojny Światowej nie było „polskich obozów śmierci”, tak też nie było „polskich gett”. Getta, w których niemieccy okupanci przetrzymywali ludność żydowską, organizowane były na ziemiach polskich, gdyż w miejscowościach przedwojennej Rzeczpospolitej znajdowały się największe skupiska ludności żydowskiej w Europie.

Nie istnieje racjonalne uzasadnienie dla używania określenia „polskie getto”. Taki  skrót myślowy jest bardzo mylący,  gdyż ani mieszkańcami, ani twórcami osiedli, jakimi były getta, nie byli przedstawiciele narodowości polskiej. Byli wśród nich co prawda obywatele polscy (narodowości żydowskiej), jednak nie ze względu na polskie obywatelstwo, lecz na żydowską narodowość. Mało tego, Polska jako państwo podczas II Wojny Światowej nie istniała – część jej terytorium zostało  włączone do Rzeszy, a na pozostałym obszarze utworzono tzw. Generalne Gubernatorstwo, twór administracyjny całkowicie podporządkowany III Rzeszy, które nie było samodzielnym bytem politycznym uznawanym na arenie międzynarodowej. Stąd przymiotnik „polski” używany dla określenia gett przeznaczonych dla ludności żydowskiej całkowicie nie ma racji bytu.

Właściwe odniesienie do tworzonych przez Niemców gett żydowskich brzmi następująco:
– Żydowskie getto założone przez Niemców w okupowanej przez Niemców Polsce
– Żydowskie getto założone przez Niemców na okupowanych przez nazistów
– Żydowskie getto w okupowanej przez Niemców Polsce
– Żydowskie getto w okupowanej Polsce

W związku z powyższym przyłączam się do wezwania Polskiej Ligii Przeciw Zniesławieniom do usunięcia wyrażenia „Polish ghetto” ze strony będącej pod Państwa administracją.

Z wyrazami szacunku,
(prosimy podać własne imię i nazwisko)

DO WKLEJENIA DO WIADOMOŚCI –timesrecordnews.com

Odbiorca:tedbuss@hotmail.com
Tytuł wiadomości (jeden do wyboru):
A request to remove defamatory content
Historical error in your article
I don’t agree!
Request for correction on your website
Please, delete the error
There was no Polish ghettos in occupied Poland
lub inny, stworzony przez Państwa

Treść wiadomości:Dear Sir,

I do inform you that despite a previous appeal by the Polish League Against Defamation regarding your statement “Polish ghetto”, it apears in the following article: https://www.timesrecordnews.com/story/opinion/2018/06/28/books-give-us-pause-thankful/741945002/. Such phrases are libellous, harmful to the good name of Poland, and historically false.

Just as there were no “Polish death camps” during World War 2, “Polish ghetto” is a misnomer as well. The ghettos in which the German occupiers forcefully detained the Jewish population were set up on Polish territory because the pre-War Poland was Europe’s largest Jewish Diaspora.

There are no reasonable grounds to use the phrase “Polish ghetto”. Even if considered a sort of verbal shortcut, it is very misleading, as neither the population of the ghettos, nor their creators, were of Polish nationality. While we could find some Polish citizens (of Jewish origin) among them, they were confined within the ghetto walls because of their Jewish roots, not because of their citizenship. But that is not all. Poland did not exist as an independent state during World War 2, as some of its territory had been annexed to Germany, and the remaining part came under the so-called General Government, an administrative entity completely subject to the German Reich. Therefore, the adjective “Polish” used with reference to WW2 Jewish ghettos is absolutely unfounded.

The proper reference to the Jewish ghettos set up by Germans therefore is as follows:
– Jewish ghetto set up by Germans in German-occupied Poland
– Jewish ghetto set up by Germans in Nazi-occupied
– Jewish ghetto in German-occupied Poland
– Jewish ghetto in Nazi-occupied Poland

I therefore wish to endorse the request by the Polish League Against Defamation and urge you to remove the defamatory expression “Polish ghetto” from the website under your administration.

Faithfully

DO WKLEJENIA DO WIADOMOŚCI – unbound.com

Odbiorca:arifa@unbound.com
Tytuł wiadomości (jeden do wyboru):
A request to remove defamatory content
Historical error in your article
I don’t agree!
Request for correction on your website
Please, delete the error
There was no Polish ghettos in occupied Poland
lub inny, stworzony przez Państwa

Treść wiadomości:Dear Sir of Madam,

I do inform you that despite a previous appeal by the Polish League Against Defamation regarding your statement “Polish ghetto”, it apears in the following article: https://unbound.com/boundless/2018/07/06/jo-glanville-on-josep-mengele/. Such phrases are libellous, harmful to the good name of Poland, and historically false.

Just as there were no “Polish death camps” during World War 2, “Polish ghetto” is a misnomer as well. The ghettos in which the German occupiers forcefully detained the Jewish population were set up on Polish territory because the pre-War Poland was Europe’s largest Jewish Diaspora.

There are no reasonable grounds to use the phrase “Polish ghetto”. Even if considered a sort of verbal shortcut, it is very misleading, as neither the population of the ghettos, nor their creators, were of Polish nationality. While we could find some Polish citizens (of Jewish origin) among them, they were confined within the ghetto walls because of their Jewish roots, not because of their citizenship. But that is not all. Poland did not exist as an independent state during World War 2, as some of its territory had been annexed to Germany, and the remaining part came under the so-called General Government, an administrative entity completely subject to the German Reich. Therefore, the adjective “Polish” used with reference to WW2 Jewish ghettos is absolutely unfounded.

The proper reference to the Jewish ghettos set up by Germans therefore is as follows:
– Jewish ghetto set up by Germans in German-occupied Poland
– Jewish ghetto set up by Germans in Nazi-occupied
– Jewish ghetto in German-occupied Poland
– Jewish ghetto in Nazi-occupied Poland

I therefore wish to endorse the request by the Polish League Against Defamation and urge you to remove the defamatory expression “Polish ghetto” from the website under your administration.

Faithfully

DO WKLEJENIA DO WIADOMOŚCI –marblehead.wickedlocal.com

Odbiorca:marblehead@wickedlocal.comcstevens@wickedlocal.com
Tytuł wiadomości (jeden do wyboru):
A request to remove defamatory content
Historical error in your article
I don’t agree!
Request for correction on your website
Please, delete the error
There was no Polish ghettos in occupied Poland
lub inny, stworzony przez Państwa

Treść wiadomości:Dear Sir or Madam,

I do inform you that despite a previous appeal by the Polish League Against Defamation regarding your statement “Polish ghetto”, it apears in the following article: http://marblehead.wickedlocal.com/news/20180619/schindlers-list-survivor-passes-memory-torch-to-marblehead-studentsSuch phrases are libellous, harmful to the good name of Poland, and historically false.

Just as there were no “Polish death camps” during World War 2, “Polish ghetto” is a misnomer as well. The ghettos in which the German occupiers forcefully detained the Jewish population were set up on Polish territory because the pre-War Poland was Europe’s largest Jewish Diaspora.

There are no reasonable grounds to use the phrase “Polish ghetto”. Even if considered a sort of verbal shortcut, it is very misleading, as neither the population of the ghettos, nor their creators, were of Polish nationality. While we could find some Polish citizens (of Jewish origin) among them, they were confined within the ghetto walls because of their Jewish roots, not because of their citizenship. But that is not all. Poland did not exist as an independent state during World War 2, as some of its territory had been annexed to Germany, and the remaining part came under the so-called General Government, an administrative entity completely subject to the German Reich. Therefore, the adjective “Polish” used with reference to WW2 Jewish ghettos is absolutely unfounded.

The proper reference to the Jewish ghettos set up by Germans therefore is as follows:
– Jewish ghetto set up by Germans in German-occupied Poland
– Jewish ghetto set up by Germans in Nazi-occupied
– Jewish ghetto in German-occupied Poland
– Jewish ghetto in Nazi-occupied Poland

I therefore wish to endorse the request by the Polish League Against Defamation and urge you to remove the defamatory expression “Polish ghetto” from the website under your administration.

Faithfully

DO WKLEJENIA DO WIADOMOŚCI –
blouinartinfo.com

Odbiorca:support@artinfo.com; generalinfo@artinfo.com
Tytuł wiadomości (jeden do wyboru):
A request to remove defamatory content
Historical error in your article
I don’t agree!
Request for correction on your website
Please, delete the error
There was no Polish ghettos in occupied Poland
lub inny, stworzony przez Państwa

Treść wiadomości:Dear Sir or Madam,

I do inform you that despite a previous appeal by the Polish League Against Defamation regarding your statement “Polish ghetto”, it apears in the following article: http://www.blouinartinfo.com/news/story/3086367/the-evolution-of-michal-rovnerSuch phrases are libellous, harmful to the good name of Poland, and historically false.

Just as there were no “Polish death camps” during World War 2, “Polish ghetto” is a misnomer as well. The ghettos in which the German occupiers forcefully detained the Jewish population were set up on Polish territory because the pre-War Poland was Europe’s largest Jewish Diaspora.

There are no reasonable grounds to use the phrase “Polish ghetto”. Even if considered a sort of verbal shortcut, it is very misleading, as neither the population of the ghettos, nor their creators, were of Polish nationality. While we could find some Polish citizens (of Jewish origin) among them, they were confined within the ghetto walls because of their Jewish roots, not because of their citizenship. But that is not all. Poland did not exist as an independent state during World War 2, as some of its territory had been annexed to Germany, and the remaining part came under the so-called General Government, an administrative entity completely subject to the German Reich. Therefore, the adjective “Polish” used with reference to WW2 Jewish ghettos is absolutely unfounded.

The proper reference to the Jewish ghettos set up by Germans therefore is as follows:
– Jewish ghetto set up by Germans in German-occupied Poland
– Jewish ghetto set up by Germans in Nazi-occupied
– Jewish ghetto in German-occupied Poland
– Jewish ghetto in Nazi-occupied Poland

I therefore wish to endorse the request by the Polish League Against Defamation and urge you to remove the defamatory expression “Polish ghetto” from the website under your administration.

Faithfully